It is important that we educate ourselves about what is happening to our planet so we can all be part of the solution. Ignoring climate change won’t make it go away.
Aimee Delach
WASHINGTON,
19
April
2018
|
04:11 PM
America/New_York

For Immediate Release

Defenders of Wildlife Launches Interactive Species and Climate Change Guide

WASHINGTON (April 18, 2018) - Defenders of Wildlife released today a Field Guide to Climate Change to mark Earth Day 2018. The online guide is a map of North America showcasing more than 50 species impacted by climate change, with fact sheets describing the species and how it is currently affected by our warming planet.

Defenders has also translated 12 of the fact sheets into Spanish.

Aimee Delach, senior climate change policy analyst for Defenders of Wildlife, issued this statement:

“On Earth Day, it is important to acknowledge that climate change is one of the greatest threats facing people and wildlife today. This is not some distant danger; changes are happening right now and species are already facing the effects.

"Defenders of Wildlife’s new interactive guide allows users to learn about species impacted and the variety of ways that climate change is manifesting—from habitats flattened by hurricanes, to diseases flourishing in warmer temperatures, to food sources disappearing. It is important that we educate ourselves about what is happening to our planet so we can all be part of the solution. Ignoring climate change won’t make it go away."

Multimedia: Our “Field Guide to Climate Change” is an interactive map of North America and the Western Hemisphere that identifies more than 50 species currently impacted by climate change.

Background:

  • The U.S. population of Sonoran pronghorn has the distinction of having very nearly been driven to extinction by a severe climate event: a 13-month drought in Arizona in 2001 to 2002.
  • Unusually warm temperatures in the Pacific Ocean appear to be leading California brown pelicans astray. For the last several years, thousands of birds have been appearing in the Columbia River, 900 miles north of their traditional breeding grounds.
  • Bull trout require the coldest water of any of our native riverine fish, with most spawning and juvenile habitat waters ranging from 48 degrees to 52 degrees F. Consequently, these trout are particularly vulnerable to climate change.
  • Moose are susceptible to heat stress in warm summers, but the bigger problem seems to be that tick populations explode when winters are warmer and the period of snow cover is shorter. Individual moose have been found with 100,000 ticks attached and sucking their blood.

Defenders of Wildlife is dedicated to the protection of all native animals and plants in their natural communities. With over 1.8 million members and activists, Defenders of Wildlife is a leading advocate for innovative solutions to safeguard our wildlife heritage for generations to come. For more information, visit Newsroom.Defenders.org and follow us on Twitter @DefendersNews.