The Wyoming Game and Fish Department and Commission continue to focus on reducing the wolf population toward the bare minimum. Wolves are an important component of Wyoming’s natural heritage, and should be managed toward achieving healthy and abundant populations across large landscapes so that they may perform their important natural role.

Rather than increase the number of wolves to be killed, Wyoming should improve outreach on the important role of wolves in the state and further promote the use of coexistence techniques that prevent conflicts. Defenders of Wildlife will continue to work with all willing partners to broaden the awareness and use of effective nonlethal methods that minimize conflicts between wolves, livestock and people and prevent unnecessary wolf mortality.

 
Jonathan Proctor, Rockies & Plains director at Defenders of Wildlife
LARAMIE, Wyo.,
11
July
2018
|
10:28 PM
America/New_York

For Immediate Release

More Wyoming Wolves in the Crosshairs with Approval of 2018 Hunting Season

The Wyoming Game and Fish Commission approved a 2018 wolf hunting season today, allowing hunting of up to 58 wolves in the trophy game area with no protected buffer areas adjacent to Grand Teton and Yellowstone national parks. The Wyoming Game and Fish Department’s (WGFD) stated goal with this proposal is to continue to push the population towards 160 wolves - the bare minimum permitted to keep the species off the endangered species list. This hunt is in addition to 84 percent of the state defined as a predator zone, meaning wolves can be killed all year with no tags or permits required.

Defenders of Wildlife submitted comments condemning the proposal for this hunting season on June 1, 2018.

Jonathan Proctor, director of the Rockies and Plains Program at Defenders of Wildlife, issued this statement:

“The Wyoming Game and Fish Department and Commission continue to focus on reducing the wolf population toward the bare minimum. Wolves are an important component of Wyoming’s natural heritage, and should be managed toward achieving healthy and abundant populations across large landscapes so that they may perform their important natural role.

“Rather than increase the number of wolves to be killed, Wyoming should improve outreach on the important role of wolves in the state and further promote the use of coexistence techniques that prevent conflicts. Defenders of Wildlife will continue to work with all willing partners to broaden the awareness and use of effective nonlethal methods that minimize conflicts between wolves, livestock and people and prevent unnecessary wolf mortality.”

Background:

WGFD continues to increase allowable wolf mortality, pushing the population closer to the bare minimum of 160 wolves required under the delisting plan. The science has increasingly shown that lethal removal of wolves can disrupt pack structure, is ineffective in the long term at reducing livestock conflicts, can prove more costly than nonlethal prevention measures and fails to increase tolerance for the species.

Some wolf packs have territories that straddle national parks and the Wyoming trophy game zone. These packs are at risk with the proposed hunting season. National parks and the wildlife that thrives within them bring in billions of dollars of revenue to local communities. In addition, wolves within national parks have contributed significantly to science and play and integral role in the ecosystem.

Wolves are already allowed to be killed without the need for a permit in nearly 84 percent of the state. Defenders of Wildlife is strongly opposed to this predator zone.

Defenders of Wildlife is dedicated to the protection of all native animals and plants in their natural communities. With over 1.8 million members and activists, Defenders of Wildlife is a leading advocate for innovative solutions to safeguard our wildlife heritage for generations to come. For more information, visit Newsroom.Defenders.org and follow us on Twitter @DefendersNews.