Our goal is to ensure humans and wildlife can coexist. This proactive, nonlethal electric fencing we’re installing will reduce human-bear conflicts – and the need for lethal removal of ‘nuisance’ bears. As black bears begin their preparation for hibernation, they will look for easy meals and these fruit trees are a prime target. This fencing will keep the bears away and allow the Nobles to reduce their economic losses, which were significant last year.

 
Pamela Flick, senior California representative for Defenders of Wildlife
PARADISE, Calif.,
11
July
2018
|
05:50 PM
America/New_York

For Immediate Release

Partners Unite on Electric Fencing Project to Reduce Bear Conflicts at Local Orchard

Defenders of Wildlife, USDA Wildlife Services and the Natural Resources Defense Council have partnered with the Noble Orchard Company to install electric fencing at the company’s commercial fruit orchard to reduce conflicts with black bears in the area. By installing electrified fencing around their property, bears will be denied access to ripe fruit, a strong attractant.

Statements:

Pamela Flick, senior California representative for Defenders of Wildlife: “Our goal is to ensure humans and wildlife can coexist. This proactive, nonlethal electric fencing we’re installing will reduce human-bear conflicts – and the need for lethal removal of ‘nuisance’ bears. As black bears begin their preparation for hibernation, they will look for easy meals and these fruit trees are a prime target. This fencing will keep the bears away and allow the Nobles to reduce their economic losses, which were significant last year.”

Dennis Orthmeyer, state director for the USDA Wildlife Services program in California: “Wildlife exclusion fencing represents an expensive way to prevent costly damage to fruit and honey production, especially for small farmers and ranchers with slim profit margins. With a mission to safeguard agriculture and natural resources, Wildlife Services hopes the addition of electric fencing to the producers’ existing eight-foot-high fences will prevent the need to remove native wildlife while supporting agricultural production. I want to thank Defenders of Wildlife and the Natural Resources Defense Council for partnering with us on this effort, as well as for the commitment of Noble Orchards to find a pathway for resolving wildlife conflict together. We often recommend fencing as a preventive measure, and this cooperative effort will help make this a viable project.”

Jim Noble, owner of Noble Orchard Company: “During the 2017 growing season, bears in large numbers inflicted severe damage to numerous varieties of fruit trees, both stone fruits and apples at Noble Orchard Company. A total of 832 producing trees were damage/destroyed. The damage loss totaled over 2.36 million dollars. The immediate goal is to dissuade the furry intruders from entering the orchards.”

Jim Noble added: “Excluding the bears from our production fields by use of the electric fence will allow the current farming operation to continue into the future to provide the region with top quality fruits and related products. Replanting will occur during the next couple of years to bring the orchards back to optimum production. An educational program will ensue to provide the local community with options of how to exist with the wildlife of the foothill areas while more importantly not providing human food sources for the wildlife.”

Laurie Noble, co-owner of Noble Orchard Company: “We look forward to seeing fewer bears on our game cameras during the upcoming season. Without our fruits as an accessible food source, wildlife will look elsewhere, hopefully back to the wild, and not go to other orchard and agricultural interests. Installation of electric fencing should impact our business by reducing bear damage and thus increasing productivity. Bears that have become habituated to fruits and human foods likely will continue to impact individual households. The community will probably continue to see damage by bears until we collectively reduce the availability of our waste by solidly containing garbage. The focus needs to shift to food wastes and garbage cans and the problems those items create for bears.”

Katie Umekubo, senior attorney with the Natural Resources Defense Council: “Electric fencing has proven again and again to be an extremely effective bear deterrent. We believe this project will both help to protect the Nobles’ orchard from future damage and keep black bears alive and out of trouble. Partnering with Defenders of Wildlife, Wildlife Services, and the Nobles is a perfect example of creative collaboration.”

Background:

Defenders of Wildlife’s Electric Fence Incentive Program reimburses 50 percent of the cost of an electric fence (up to $500) for securing items that attract bears, such as chickens and other livestock, garbage, bees, gardens and fruit trees. The incentive is available in eligible counties in Idaho, Montana, Wyoming and eastern Washington. This is Defenders’ first electric fence project to deter bear conflicts in California. Since the program’s launch in 2010, we have helped more than 315 landowners complete electric fences on private lands. Defenders continues to monitor pre- and post-fencing human-bear conflicts on private lands by surveying participants whose electric fences have been in use for greater than one year. With more than a third of past participants surveyed, 95% of fences are still in use (the five percent not in use are because the participant removed the attractant or personally relocated) and 98% report that their fence has been successful.

The Natural Resources Defense Council has long worked with agricultural producers, Wildlife Services, state wildlife agencies, and our conservation colleagues across the northwestern U.S. to promote nonlethal wildlife conflict resolution strategies. NRDC looks for opportunities to collaborate on projects that create win-win solutions for humans and wildlife. Our projects have involved building temporary and permanent electric fencing, hiring range riders, removing attractants, and utilizing other proactive measures to reduce conflicts between people and large carnivores.

Defenders of Wildlife is dedicated to the protection of all native animals and plants in their natural communities. With over 1.8 million members and activists, Defenders of Wildlife is a leading advocate for innovative solutions to safeguard our wildlife heritage for generations to come. For more information, visit Newsroom.Defenders.org and follow us on Twitter @DefendersNews.

The mission of USDA Wildlife Services (WS) is to provide Federal leadership and expertise to resolve wildlife conflicts to allow people and wildlife to coexist. WS conducts program delivery, research, and other activities through its Regional and State Offices, the National Wildlife Research Center (NWRC) and its Field Stations, as well as through its National Programs. For WS assistance in your state, please call (866) 487-3297.

The Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC) is an international nonprofit environmental organization with more than 3 million members and online activists. Since 1970, our lawyers, scientists, and other environmental specialists have worked to protect the world’s natural resources, public health, and the environment. For more information, please visit nrdc.org and follow us on Twitter @NRDC.

Noble Orchard Company has been producing quality apples, stone fruits and other products on the Paradise Ridge since 1921. Began by Grandpa Noble, run by his son and now his Grandson Jim and wife Laurie Noble the orchard continues in family ownership. Year 100 is just around the corner and it would be nice to resolve the bear issues by our centennial celebration. Come visit our farm and see the historic packing shed built by Grandpa Noble in 1931-32.